Small towns of Germany is a real fairy tale everyone can get into. As soon as you move a little aside from the noisy cities, you can immediately see another life — calm, unhurried and peaceful. Here, surrounded by cozy Fachwerk houses, it seems like the time had stopped several centuries ago. If you want to take a break from the bustle of the city, you simply can’t imagine a better place!

Monschau

The Red House of the 18th century, the famous Mustard Mill of the 19th century, numerous half-timbered houses and bewitching landscapes — this is the way Monschau captures tourists. If you want to see a city where time stopped 300 years ago, you will definitely like this one!

Monschau

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Monschau

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Monschau

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Small towns of Germany: Garmisch-Partenkirchen

In a magnificent valley surrounded by majestic mountains, there is the largest and most fashionable resort in Bavaria. And although this is more a place for skiing, in summer it will not be boring either. Nearby you will find the magnificent Linderhof Palace, Germany’s highest mountain peak Zugspitze and the legendary Neuschwanstein Castle. Traditional painted houses with bright colors on the windows make a walk around the city a real high day!

Garmisch-Partenkirchen
Garmisch-Partenkirchen
Garmisch-Partenkirchen

Oberammergau

Not far from Garmisch-Partenkirchen is another picturesque town of Oberammergau, whose old houses are also decorated with frescoes. Due to its small size and close distance from Garmisch-Partenkirchen, both Bavarian cities can be visited in one day.

Oberammergau

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Oberammergau

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Oberammergau

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Small towns of Germany: Bacharach

This beautiful ancient town in the Rhine Valley existed before the arrival of the Romans. Its historical part is surrounded by a powerful wall built in 1344–1364, and on the hill above the city majestically rises Shtalek castle.

Bacharach

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Bacharach

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Bacharach

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Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Bavarian town of Rothenburg ob der Tauber is considered to be one of the best preserved medieval cities in Europe. Its ancient walls and towers remained intact after the Thirty Years’ War of 1618. Some buildings were destroyed during the Second World War, but they were quickly restored afterwards.

Rothenburg ob der Tauber

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Rothenburg ob der Tauber

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Rothenburg ob der Tauber

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Small towns of Germany: Schiltach

This small romantic town, located in Schwarzwald, has also managed to maintain its original medieval appearance. Narrow streets, the old town hall on the market square and numerous Fachwerk houses for centuries preserve that unique atmosphere of an ancient city.

Schiltach

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Schiltach

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Schiltach

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Quedlinburg

Quedlinburg is called the German Fachwerk reserve, because it has 1300 ancient buildings built using this technology. The oldest house in the city (and in all East Germany!) was built in the first half of the 14th century. The houses survived due to the fact that the city miraculously managed to avoid the bombing during World War II.

Quedlinburg

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Quedlinburg

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Quedlinburg

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Small towns of Germany: Trier

The ancient city, founded by the Romans and claiming to be the oldest city in Germany, is located in the wine-growing region of the Moselle. In 2009, historians calculated not only the exact date, but also the time the city was founded: 7 hours 11 minutes on September 23, 16 BC. It coincides with both the day of the autumnal equinox and the Birthday of Emperor Augustus, who, in fact, founded the city.

Trier

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Trier

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Trier

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Meersburg

A small resort town on the shores of Lake Constance boasts the only medieval castle in this region and three (!) palaces. The history of this city began in the 12th century, and its beautiful flowering streets have perfectly preserved since those ancient times.

Meersburg

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Meersburg

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Meersburg

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Small towns of Germany: Mittenwald

Another Bavarian town, which is located right near the border with Austria in a picturesque valley surrounded by the Alps. After seeing the local attractions, you can climb Mount Karwendel to enjoy breathtaking views of the surroundings of Mittenwald and the Alps.

Mittenwald

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Mittenwald

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Mittenwald

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Cochem

A small town of Cochem in the Moselle Valley keeps its little secret. In addition to its ancient castle, it houses the repository of the German Federal Bank and the nuclear bunker, which was used to store money.

Cochem

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Cochem

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Cochem

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Small towns of Germany: Bamberg

A small ancient city of kings and bishops, located on seven hills in the northern part of Bavaria, managed to maintain its unique appearance. Here you will find buildings dating from the 11th to the 19th century, including the Old Town Hall on the river and the old Romanesque Bamberg Cathedral, founded in the 11th century.

Bamberg

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Bamberg

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Bamberg

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Dinkelsbühl

A charming medieval town on the border of Baden-Wurtenberg and Bavaria will delight you with well-preserved ancient architecture. Half-timbered houses with tiled roofs, original Gothic inscriptions on houses and cozy cobbled streets — all this beauty miraculously avoided any bombing and destruction!

Dinkelsbühl

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Dinkelsbühl

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Dinkelsbühl

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Small towns of Germany: Lübeck

The hallmark of the city is the Holstentor — one of four town gates, which hosts the historical museum nowadays. The prominent place of Lübeck is its town hall, which is the oldest functioning town hall in Germany. Many years ago Lübeck was one of the richest cities of the Old World.

Lübeck

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Lübeck

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Lübeck

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Ramsau

Bavaria is a real paradise for those who adore antiquities, traditions and stunning nature. In one of its corners, not far from Lake Königssee, the small town of Ramsau is comfortably located. Its main attraction is the church of St. Sebastian, which can often be found on the covers of Germany travel guides.

Ramsau

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Ramsau

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Ramsau

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Small towns of Germany: Wernigerode

The city, which is located in Saxony-Anhalt, is famous for its medieval castle, the first mention of which dates back to the beginning of the 12th century. For centuries, it was the residence of local rulers. Cozy streets of the city are full of colorful Fachwerk houses. The most famous buildings of the city date back to the 18th, 13th and even 12th centuries.

Wernigerode

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Wernigerode

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Wernigerode

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Meissen

Meissen, which is only a few tens of kilometers from Dresden, is famous for its legendary Meissen porcelain, the first manufactory of which was founded here in 1710. The ancient city, located on the Saxon Wine Route, almost did not suffer during the Second World War, so it managed to maintain its medieval appearance.

Meissen

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Meissen

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Meissen

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Small towns of Germany: Schwerin

The quiet little town of Schwerin, which is the capital of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, is often called the «the city of seven lakes and forests.» The symbol of the city is Schwerin Castle, located on a picturesque island in the historical center. From the 12th to the 17th centuries, and then from the 19th century, Schwerin was the residence of the Dukes of Mecklenburg. Many buildings erected during the era of the dukes, have survived to this day.

Schwerin

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Schwerin

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Schwerin

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Freiburg

The city, founded in 1120, will fascinate you with its soulful and harmonious atmosphere. Legend says that the inventor of gunpowder Bertold Schwartz and the humanist Erasmus of Rotterdam lived in the city. They also say that the famous Schwarzwald cherry cake and the cuckoo clock were invented in Freiburg too. Be that as it may, the ancient city, which is located on the very edge of the Schwarzwald, will delight you with beautiful old architecture and breathtaking views over the surroundings.

Freiburg

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Freiburg

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Freiburg

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Small towns of Germany: Michelstadt

The first mention of the city dates back to 741. Michelstadt developed in different eras, so on its streets you can see medieval, as well as Renaissance and Baroque Fachwerk houses. The feature of the city is the town hall, built in 1484. There also is a castle built in the 10th century.

Michelstadt

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Michelstadt

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Michelstadt

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